reservierte Subdomains?

Bind, PowerDNS
lucideye
Posts: 12
Joined: 2002-10-20 22:58

reservierte Subdomains?

Post by lucideye » 2003-03-04 01:14

Hallo,

Hab' die letzten Tage ein Subdomain-Script programmiert. Ist jetzt soweit fertig, allerdings wolte ich noch wissen, ob es irgendwelche reservierten Subdomainnamen gibt, abgesehen von "www" die auf keinen Fall registriert werden dürfen sollten.

Sind irgendwelche Probleme zu erwarten bei einziffrigen Subdomains, z.b. 1.domain.com bzw. a.domain.com oder bei Subdomains, die nur aus Zahlen bestehen, wie 123.domain.com?

Vielen Dank,

Alex

floschi
Userprojekt
Userprojekt
Posts: 3247
Joined: 2002-07-18 08:13
Location: München

Re: reservierte Subdomains?

Post by floschi » 2003-03-04 01:43

ich verschiebe ins DNS-Forum ;)

kase
Posts: 1031
Joined: 2002-10-14 22:56

Re: reservierte Subdomains?

Post by kase » 2003-03-04 01:54

www,ftp,ns,ns2,mail,mail2,mx,mx2

sind die wichtigsten.

Ansonsten vielleicht noch:

irc,backup,server,ssl

kA, liegt auch etwas daran, welche Subdomains du brauchst.

Soviel ich weiß, gibt es keine Probleme mit 1 stelligen Subdomains, auch wenn diese aus nur einer Zahl besteht.

Bei Sonderzeichen ist nur das - zugelassen.

dodolin
Posts: 3840
Joined: 2003-01-21 01:59
Location: Sinsheim/Karlsruhe

Re: reservierte Subdomains?

Post by dodolin » 2003-03-04 02:18

Ich pflege es da mit dem Spruch "use the source, luke" (keine Ahnung, von wem der war...) zu halten und in den RFCs zu blättern. -> http://www.google.com/search?q=dns+rfc
Damit findet man z.B. zu http://www.zoneedit.com/doc/rfc/
Was also für dich interessant sein könnte:
http://www.zoneedit.com/doc/rfc/rfc2219.txt
http://www.zoneedit.com/doc/rfc/rfc2181.txt Abschnitt 11
http://www.zoneedit.com/doc/rfc/rfc1912.txt Abschnitt 2.1
http://www.zoneedit.com/doc/rfc/rfc1178.txt
http://www.zoneedit.com/doc/rfc/rfc1123.txt Abschnitt 2.1
http://www.zoneedit.com/doc/rfc/rfc1034.txt Abschnitt 3.1

Have Fun! :lol:

[tom]
Posts: 656
Joined: 2003-01-08 20:10
Location: Berlin

Re: reservierte Subdomains?

Post by [tom] » 2003-03-04 02:40

Lucideye wrote: Hab' die letzten Tage ein Subdomain-Script programmiert. Ist jetzt soweit fertig, allerdings wolte ich noch wissen, ob es irgendwelche reservierten Subdomainnamen gibt, abgesehen von "www" die auf keinen Fall registriert werden dürfen sollten.
Ich versteh die Frage nicht. Subdomains werden nie registriert und "www" ist keine reservierte Subdomain (es gibt keine reservierten Third-Level Subdomains).
Lucideye wrote: Sind irgendwelche Probleme zu erwarten bei einziffrigen Subdomains, z.b. 1.domain.com bzw. a.domain.com oder bei Subdomains, die nur aus Zahlen bestehen, wie 123.domain.com?
Nein, da eine Verwechslungsgefahr mit IP Adressen ausgeschlossen ist.

[TOM]

dodolin
Posts: 3840
Joined: 2003-01-21 01:59
Location: Sinsheim/Karlsruhe

Re: reservierte Subdomains?

Post by dodolin » 2003-03-04 03:09

Ich versteh die Frage nicht. Subdomains werden nie registriert und "www" ist keine reservierte Subdomain (es gibt keine reservierten Third-Level Subdomains).
Da hast'e natürlich auch wieder Recht. :-D
Lucideye wrote:Sind irgendwelche Probleme zu erwarten bei einziffrigen Subdomains, z.b. 1.domain.com bzw. a.domain.com oder bei Subdomains, die nur aus Zahlen bestehen, wie 123.domain.com?
[TOM] wrote:Nein, da eine Verwechslungsgefahr mit IP Adressen ausgeschlossen ist.
Hm... prinzipiell hast du ja Recht, aber: :wink:
RFC 1911, Abschnitt 2.1 wrote: DNS domain names consist of "labels" separated by single dots. The
DNS is very liberal in its rules for the allowable characters in a
domain name. However, if a domain name is used to name a host, it
should follow rules restricting host names. Further if a name is
used for mail, it must follow the naming rules for names in mail
addresses.

Allowable characters in a label for a host name are only ASCII
letters, digits, and the `-' character. Labels may not be all
numbers, but may have a leading digit (e.g., 3com.com). Labels must
end and begin only with a letter or digit. See [RFC 1035] and [RFC
1123]. (Labels were initially restricted in [RFC 1035] to start with
a letter, and some older hosts still reportedly have problems with
the relaxation in [RFC 1123].) Note there are some Internet
hostnames which violate this rule (411.org, 1776.com). The presence
of underscores in a label is allowed in [RFC 1033], except [RFC 1033]
is informational only and was not defining a standard. There is at
least one popular TCP/IP implementation which currently refuses to
talk to hosts named with underscores in them. It must be noted that
the language in [1035] is such that these rules are voluntary -- they
are there for those who wish to minimize problems. Note that the
rules for Internet host names also apply to hosts and addresses used
in SMTP (See RFC 821).

If a domain name is to be used for mail (not involving SMTP), it must
follow the rules for mail in [RFC 822], which is actually more
liberal than the above rules. Labels for mail can be [...]

[tom]
Posts: 656
Joined: 2003-01-08 20:10
Location: Berlin

Re: reservierte Subdomains?

Post by [tom] » 2003-03-04 03:34

RFC 1911? Das ist zum einen für "Voice Profile for Internet Mail", experimental, obsolete und es gibt keinen Abschnitt 2.1. ;-)

Abgesehen davon hast Du aber recht, dass man schon zwischen "Domain" und "Label" unterscheiden muß. Ich bin aber im Moment zu faul, das aktuelle RFC zu suchen. ;-) Es kann aber sein, dass es sich immer noch auf Lables bezieht.

[TOM]

[monk]
Posts: 163
Joined: 2002-08-09 17:31
Location: Ulm

Re: reservierte Subdomains?

Post by [monk] » 2003-03-04 06:54

dodolin wrote:Ich pflege es da mit dem Spruch "use the source, luke" (keine Ahnung, von wem der war...) ...
Obiwan :wink:

dodolin
Posts: 3840
Joined: 2003-01-21 01:59
Location: Sinsheim/Karlsruhe

Re: reservierte Subdomains?

Post by dodolin » 2003-03-04 11:06

[TOM] wrote:RFC 1911?
Sorry, man sollte es lassen, wenn man zu später Stunde nicht mehr korrekt von seinem obigen Post abschreiben kann. 1912, Abschnitt 2.1 meinte ich natürlich.
[MONK] wrote:Obiwan
Danke dir. :-D

Nochmal Nachtrag, warum [TOM] "eigentlich" ja Recht hatte, aber halt nur "eigentlich":
Aus RFC 2181, Abschnitt 11:
11. Name syntax

Occasionally it is assumed that the Domain Name System serves only
the purpose of mapping Internet host names to data, and mapping
Internet addresses to host names. This is not correct, the DNS is a
general (if somewhat limited) hierarchical database, and can store
almost any kind of data, for almost any purpose.

The DNS itself places only one restriction on the particular labels
that can be used to identify resource records. That one restriction
relates to the length of the label and the full name. The length of
any one label is limited to between 1 and 63 octets. A full domain
name is limited to 255 octets (including the separators). The zero
length full name is defined as representing the root of the DNS tree,
and is typically written and displayed as ".". Those restrictions
aside, any binary string whatever can be used as the label of any
resource record. Similarly, any binary string can serve as the value
of any record that includes a domain name as some or all of its value
(SOA, NS, MX, PTR, CNAME, and any others that may be added).
Implementations of the DNS protocols must not place any restrictions
on the labels that can be used. In particular, DNS servers must not
refuse to serve a zone because it contains labels that might not be
acceptable to some DNS client programs. A DNS server may be
configurable to issue warnings when loading, or even to refuse to
load, a primary zone containing labels that might be considered
questionable, however this should not happen by default.

Note however, that the various applications that make use of DNS data
can have restrictions imposed on what particular values are
acceptable in their environment. For example, that any binary label
can have an MX record does not imply that any binary name can be used
as the host part of an e-mail address. Clients of the DNS can impose
whatever restrictions are appropriate to their circumstances on the
values they use as keys for DNS lookup requests, and on the values
returned by the DNS. If the client has such restrictions, it is
solely responsible for validating the data from the DNS to ensure
that it conforms before it makes any use of that data.

See also [RFC1123] section 6.1.3.5.